The “Apple v. Samsung” Global Patent Battles Continue

Meera El-Farhan

 

What started a year ago, with Apple filing suit in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California against Samsung Electronics Co., has now expanded to more than 50 patent war lawsuits across four continents and at least eight countries. Throughout this escalating legal global battle, with billions of dollars at stake, the smartphone and tablet powerhouses continue, however, to be dependent business partners, and Samsung remains Apple’s largest semiconductor component supplier for iOS devices (a deal worth $8 billion). [1]

In its initial 38-page complaint, Apple claimed unfair competition, trademark infringements, and patent infringements; whereby, Apple alleged Samsung’s smartphones and Galaxy Tab 10.1 “slavishly” copied the iPhone and iPad designs. Samsung responded to Apple’s design patent and trade dress infringement claims by filing cross-claims. Samsung sought revocation of the patent claims and further alleged that the iPhone and iPad infringed on Samsung’s technology patents (including wireless data communication technology). Additionally, Samsung filed suit in South Korean, Japanese, and German courts.

On December 2, 2011, the district court denied Apple’s motion for preliminary injunction for the following devices:

(1) Samsung Galaxy S 4G and Infuse 4G smartphones for allegedly infringing on U.S. Des. Patent No. 618, 677 (“the D’677 patent”), U.S. Des. Patent No. 593,087 (the D’087 patent”), and (3) U.S. Patent No. 7, 469,381 (the ‘381 patent).

(2) Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 tablet computer for allegedly infringing on U.S. Des. Patent No. 504,889 (the D’889 patent”), and U.S. Patent No. 7469,381 (the ‘381 patent).

(3) Samsung 4G LTE smartphone for allegedly infringing on U.S. Patent No. 7,469,381 (the ‘381 patent”)[2]

The federal circuit affirmed the court’s order in part, but remanded for further proceeding with respect to the D’889 Patent. [3]  On June 26, 2012, the district court found the balance of hardship for the D’889 patent to tip in Apple’s favor.[4] The court acknowledged that “although Samsung will necessarily be harmed by being forced to withdraw its product from the market before the merits can be determined after full trial, the harm faced by Apple absent an injunction on the Galaxy Tab 10.1 is greater.”[5]  The court further found the design to be an important driver for sales; thus the injunction was not based on “one aspect of the overall product.”[6] However, as a condition of the injunction, the court ordered Apple to secure a $2.6 billion bond to repay Samsung for any damages in the event the injunction is found to have been issued wrongfully.[7]

With the trial starting on July 30, 2012, Apple demanding $2.5 billion in damages in addition to an injunction barring the sale of any infringing Samsung devices, in addition to the U.S. large electronic consumer market, the two electronic giants face high stakes in the trial’s outcome.

Germany: a preliminary injunction in August of 2011 was ordered by a German court to ban the sales of Galaxy 10.1 Tab in all the European Union except for the Netherlands. A week later, the ban was scaled back to Germany, and the 10.1 tab was returned to the EU shelves. Samsung sidestepped the injunction by introducing a Galaxy Tab 10.1N model for Germany. Apple contested the new design immediately. Although Apple lost twice on appeal for banning the sale of the 10.1 Tab, the German court in July, 2012 ruled in favor of Apple by banning the sale of Galaxy Tab 7.7 in Europe.

Australia: the battle extended to an Australian Federal Court in October, 2011. Apple sought, and was granted, an interlocutory injunction restraining Samsung from releasing the 10.1 Tab. Although the Australian Court granted Apple an interlocutory injunction, Samsung won on appeal. Apple continued to file for an appeal to the High Court.  The High Court, in refusing a special leave, allowed Samsung to sell the 10.1 just in time for  Christmas season. Samsung counter-sued Apple in April, 2012. The federal court began its hearing in late July, 2012.

Other Countries: The UK court ruled in favor of Samsung by finding Tablets 10.1, 8.9, and 7.7 did not infringe upon the alleged Apple patent.  Samsung and Apple continue to battle in patent-related lawsuits in Japanese, Korean, and European courts.

 

Aftermath

The multi-billion dollar patent warfare is likely to reshape legal and production strategies for both parties. Unfortunately, in the expanding smartphone market, price effects on consumer electronics are too uncertain to predict for now; however, the outcome of lawsuit battle will draw the line between competition and protection of intellectual property in the smartphone industry.


[2] Apple, Inc. v. Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd., 11-CV-01846-LHK, 2011 WL 7036077 (N.D. Cal. Dec. 2, 2011) aff’d in part, vacated in part, remanded, 678 F.3d 1314 (Fed. Cir. 2012)

[3]Apple, Inc. v. Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd., 678 F.3d 1314 (Fed. Cir. 2012)

[4] Apple, Inc. v. Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd., 11-CV-01846-LHK, 2012 WL 2401680 (N.D. Cal. June 26, 2012)

[5] Id.

[6] Id.

[7] Id.

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